Scouts Out: Errata & Addenda

“To err is human, to buy my book divine!”

Scouts_Out-Final_Draft-Author_Comments 46 Page 36: Delete the semicolon in the highlighted text to read:

half-track and fully tracked vehicles

 Scouts_Out-Final_Draft-Author_Comments 82 Page 72: Insert the preposition “in” into the text as indicated:

For those used to NATO-style map symbols, the myriad German tactical symbols used in organization charts (and maps) of the World War II era can seem to be a daunting task at first.

Scouts_Out-Final_Draft-Author_Comments 88 Page 78: Insert the phrase “car companies” into the caption text as indicated:

Aufklärungs-Abteilung 373 of the 373. Infanterie-Division (kroat.) in September 1943. It was later to form two armored car companies out of captured Italian vehicle stocks.

Scouts_Out-Final_Draft-Author_Comments 111 Page 101: Two corrections. In the first instance, change “251” to “250” in the highlighted text:

had an armored car company, two armored reconnaissance companies (equipped with the Sd.Kfz. 250), and a heavy company.35

In the second instance, delete the second highlighted paragraph (the first one was already deleted in the print run):

• One armored reconnaissance company (Panzer-Aufklärungs-Kompanie (Krad), (Kettenkrad) or (VW)) (4th)

Scouts_Out-Final_Draft-Author_Comments 113 Page 103: Change “251” to “250” in the highlighted text:

• Two armored reconnaissance companies (Panzer-Aufklärungs-Kompanien [gp]) (3rd and 4th), each equipped with the Sd.Kfz. 250 and armed with forty-nine light machine guns, three 7.5cm anti-tank guns, and two medium mortars

Page 118: Alert reader Paul from the UK has provided additional information for the section concerning “Higher Commands,” specifically the Fallschirm-Aufklärungs-Abteilung 12 and 11.

Both your narrative and the organizational diagram describes this unit as having 5 companies, one of Panzerspähwagen and three of SPW’s, plus a supply company.

This has always struck me as an odd organization for an airborne corps, in so much that Fallschirmjäger (excepting the HG Division of course) were fundamentally infantry, whereas the reconnaissance battalion as described is effectively an armored one and issued armored vehicles. It does not not add up, even though the diagram is German WWII and shows that situation.

As it happens, I have had some recent correspondence with a gentleman, who has researched this formation quite deeply and his research has yielded an entirely different unit structure and one that makes more sense, particularly with regard to the infantry versus armor comments above.

The data are compiled from US Army POW interrogations of personnel who had been assigned to Fallschirm-Aufklärungs-Abteilung 12 and had been captured in Normandy, they stated that the battalion had the following organization:

  • Headquarters: 1x 6×6 Italian Armored Car, 3x Italian B4 tanks
  • 1st Company (Rifle): 2x VW Kübelwagen, 8x trucks, 3x half-tracks (SPW?)
  • 2nd Company (Rifle):As in the 1st Company
  • 3rd Company (Rifle):As in the 1st Company
  • 4th Company (Light Antiaircraft): 4x 2cm Flak (not verified)
  • 5th Company (Heavy Weapons): 1x 12cm mortar, 2x Pak 40, 12x trucks
  • 6th Company (Maintenance and Supply)

All company commanders are named in these reports, and it is also possible that the half-tracks mentioned might well be something like Kettenkräder for gun towing or something similar.

So, as you can see, there is no commonality between the diagram and your narrative that goes with it and these POW statements. As the airborne corps was essentially infantry, the POW descriptions make much more sense. Their poor levels of equipment do very much reflect units put together in 1944.

Scouts_Out-Final_Draft-Author_Comments 137 Page 127: Insert the number “20” into the caption text, as indicated:

Various armored cars of the 1./Aufklärungs-Abteilung 20 (mot) move down a fog-shrouded road in this atmospheric scene.

Scouts_Out-Final_Draft-Author_Comments 204 Page 194: Insert the following text into the highlighted passage:

The men of the König (“King”) wear a variety of early and late headgear and uniforms, with the vehicle commander wearing the field-gray version of the Panzer jacket. Of further interest is the “star” antenna, which indicated a command & control radio set had been installed in this vehicle. (This image comes from a photo album featuring Knight’s Cross recipient Oberfähnrich Erwin Krüger, which is featured later in the book.) JIM HALEY

Scouts_Out-Final_Draft-Author_Comments 216 Page 206: Insert the following text into the highlighted passage:

This Sd.Kfz. 234/1, attributed to Panzer-Aufklärungs-Abteilung 4 of the 4. Panzer-Division, features a distinctive late-war three-tone camouflage pattern. Images of the Sd.Kfz. 234 series of vehicles are hard to find because comparatively so few were produced and the situation at the front rarely allowed time for luxuries such as photography.

Page 210: Alert reader Paul from the UK has provided additional information for several photographs. The Puma seen on this page is identified as belonging to the 1./Panzeraufklärungs-Abteilung 2 of the 2. Panzer-Division in Normandy.

Page 212: The Puma in the lower photo is identified as having been assigned to the Stabskompanie of SS-Panzer-Aufklärungs-Abteilung 1 of the 1. SS-Panzer-Division “Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler.”

Scouts_Out-Final_Draft-Author_Comments 240 Page 230: Insert the following amplifying comments after the vehicle nomenclature:

Sd.Kfz 250/3 (Light Armored Communications Vehicle)

Sd.Kfz. 250/5 (Light Armored Observation Vehicle)

Sd.Kfz. 250/7 (Heavy Mortar or Mortar Ammunition Carrier)

Scouts_Out-Final_Draft-Author_Comments 241 Page 231: Insert the following amplifying comments after the vehicle nomenclature:

Sd.Kfz. 250/8 (Light Armored Personnel Carrier with 7.5cm Main Gun)

Scouts_Out-Final_Draft-Author_Comments 242 Page 232: Insert the following amplifying comments after the vehicle nomenclature:

Sd.Kfz. 250/9 (Light Scout Armored Personnel Carrier)

Scouts_Out-Final_Draft-Author_Comments 244 Page 234: Insert the following amplifying comments after the vehicle nomenclature:

Sd.Kfz 250/10 (Light Armored Personnel carrier with 3.7cm Antitank Gun)

Sd.Kfz. 250/11 (Light Armored Personnel carrier with 2.8cm Antitank Rifle)

Sd.Kfz. 251/1 (Medium Armored Personnel Carrier)

Sd.Kfz. 251/3 (Medium Armored Communications Vehicle)

Scouts_Out-Final_Draft-Author_Comments 252  Page 242: Insert the following amplifying comments after the vehicle nomenclature:

Sd.Kfz. 2 (Kettenkrad)

Page 262: Paul from the UK found another incorrect identification on this page. The vehicle identified as a Horch prime mover is actually a Krupp Protze.

Scouts_Out-Final_Draft-Author_Comments 291scouts-error-281  Page 281: Alert reader Chris from France—known as “Derka” on many militaria forums—noticed that the bottom image was inaccurately captioned, since it states that the enlisted scout in the image is wearing a 1st-pattern reed-green special-purpose uniform for armored vehicle crewmen. In fact, the scout in question is simply wearing a reed-green HBT field uniform, with the tunic bottom tucked into his trousers. Thanks, Chris!

Page 285: Paul from the UK points out that the Puma seen on this page has the turret number 041, which would place it with Panzer-Aufklärungs-Abteilung 20 of the 20. Panzer-Division, a  battalion also seen on Page 215.

Scouts_Out-Final_Draft-Author_Comments 352 Page 342: Changed misspelled text as follows:

…this action earned him the Knight’s Cross.

Scouts_Out-Final_Draft-Author_Comments 363 Page 353: Insert the following text into the highlighted passage:

Notes: Originally a separate battalion, it was redesignated and a subordinate battalion of the short-lived Aufklärungs-Regiment 6 in 1938, only to be redesignated as Aufklärungs-Abteilung 8 (mot) in late 1938 and assigned to 5. Panzer-Division.

Scouts_Out-Final_Draft-Author_Comments 364Page 354: Insert the following text into the highlighted passage:

End of 1944—Headquarters (with armored car sections), 1st Armored Scout Company (half-track), 2nd Light Armored Reconnaissance Company (half-track), and 3rd Armored Reconnaissance Company (half-track)

Scouts_Out-Final_Draft-Author_Comments 376  Page 366: Insert the following text into the highlighted passage:

April 1944—Headquarters (with armored car sections), 1st Armored Scout Company (Luchs), 2nd Light Armored Reconnaissance Company (half-track), 3rd Armored Reconnaissance Company (half-track), 4th Heavy Armored Reconnaissance Company (half-track)

Scouts_Out-Final_Draft-Author_Comments 394 Page 384: Change misspelled word in highlighted text as follows:

At that point, a vehicle from our patrol broke off and moved towards the VW at high speed.

Scouts_Out-Final_Draft-Author_Comments 399  Page 389: Insert the following text into the highlighted passage:

July 1944—Headquarters (with armored car sections), 1st Armored Scout Company (Luchs), 2nd Light Armored Reconnaissance Company (half-track), 3rd Armored Reconnaissance Company (half-track), 4th Heavy Armored Reconnaissance Company (half-track)

Scouts_Out-Final_Draft-Author_Comments 422 Page 412: Add text to the highlighted passage as follows:

Sometimes a bit of military sightseeing was in order, since soldiers of all armies enjoy looking at military equipment. In this instance, the scouts are looking at ex-British Mark IV tanks.

Scouts_Out-Final_Draft-Author_Comments 463 Page 453: Corrected misspelling in the highlighted text as follows:

Unteroffizier August Roth, 3./Panzer-Aufklärungs-Abteilung 116 (20 January 1945);

Page 477: Paul from the UK identifies the trucks seen on this page as “ex-British Bedford 15 cwt MWD trucks, all in good order suggesting a Wehrmacht refurbishment after capture in France 1940, so very unlikely to be SS-Verfügungs-Division France 1940, more likely later in Russia.”

Scouts_Out-Final_Draft-Author_Comments 521  Page 511: Insert text in the highlighted passage as follows:

Nr. 20 (dated 15 October 1940, paragraph not listed), and Nr. 17 (dated 1 September 1942, paragraph 309).

ScoutsOut_Color-Insert-Comments-Edwards-Olive-Pruett 47 Color Section, not paginated: Change text as indicated in the highlighted passage:

An additional view of the jacket and some details of the insignia. Hain was one of the few personnel in the Panzertruppe who were also entitled to wear the Kreta cuff title, since he was in Kradschützen-Bataillon 55, which participated in the island invasion in 1940. Some of Hain’s other high awards and assignments can be gleaned from the job application seen here that he prepared to work for the Allies after the war.

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